Our Category: Scam Alerts

Last Reminder: Your account will be limited until we hear from you. – PayPal Phishing Scams

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Please send us any scam/phishing emails you have received by reporting them here

For access to our huge blacklist of domain names and to sign up to our live feed of ALL the scams we receive please take a look at our Honeytrap service

If you have received the email below, please remember that it is very common for these email scams to be redistributed at a later date with only slightly different content, such as a different subject or return address, or with the fake webpage(s) hosted on a different webserver.

We aim to report every variant of the scams we receive, so even if it appears that a scam you receive has already been reported, please submit it to us anyway.



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Please send us any scam/phishing emails you have received by reporting them here For access to our huge blacklist of domain names and to sign up to our live feed of ALL the scams we receive please take a look at our Honeytrap service If you have received the email below, please remember that it […]

 

Spam complaints policy | ACMA

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Background

The ACMA is responsible for the enforcement of the Spam Act 2003 (the Spam Act) and accepts complaints, reports and enquiries about spam from the Australian public. This process is managed by the Anti-spam Team (AST).

Complaints can be submitted to the ACMA by the completion of an online form, specifically tailored to whether the complaint is about an electronic message sent by email, SMS or MMS, or instant message, as covered by the Spam Act.

Spam email can be reported to the ACMA by forwarding the message by email to report@submit.spam.acma.gov.au. Spam SMS can be reported by forwarding the message to 0429 999 888.

To learn more about why the ACMA is collecting personal information as part of this process, and the purposes for which that information will be used, please see the Collection Notification information here.

Enquiries can be made by telephone to 1300 855 180.


Important note:

When forwarding an email message, please do not change the subject line of the message or add additional text. The ACMA will only contact you in relation to a report if it requires further information to assist it in its anti-spam activities.

Purpose

The complaints handling policy is intended to provide guidance to the Australian public on how complaints, reports and enquiries about spam are managed by the ACMA.

Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions found in the Spam Act apply.

complainant—person, organisation or its representative, making a complaint.

complaint—expression of dissatisfaction made to the ACMA about spam, where a reporter has specific qualitative information they wish to add.

enquiry—a request for information.

message sender—person, organisation or its representative who it is alleged sent, or caused to be sent, the electronic message which is the subject of the complaint or report.

report—an advice of spam activity directed to the ACMA’s anti-spam databases. These will not be actioned individually but assist the ACMA in its anti-spam activities.

report email address—the email address report@submit.spam.acma.gov.au that can be used by the public to report email spam to the ACMA.

Important note:

When forwarding an email message, please do not change the subject line of the message or add additional text. The ACMA will only contact you in relation to a report if it requires further information to assist it in its anti-spam activities.

respondent—the individual or organisation identified that is the subject of a complaint about spam activity to the ACMA.

submitter—a person submitting a complaint, enquiry or report through the ACMA website. A submitter becomes a complainant when their submission is accepted as a complaint by the ACMA.

spam—unsolicited commercial electronic messages.

Spam SMS—the dedicated telephone number 0429 999 888 that can be used to report spam SMS to the ACMA.

transcript—for the purposes of this policy, a transcript is a copy of an email, SMS, MMS or instant message that is the subject of the complaint, report or enquiry.

Guiding principles

All staff at the ACMA must comply with the Australian Public Service Code of Conduct.

This policy should be read in tandem with the ACMA’s Client Service Charter.

The ACMA’s Privacy Policy contains information including how you can access and correct personal information, how you can make a complaint about the ACMA’s compliance with the Privacy Act and Privacy contact details.

Online submission of complaints

Difference between complaints and reports

By using the online form, the ACMA will generally consider the submission a complaint providing a complainant has given the requisite information. By using the report email address and/or Spam SMS, the submission will be considered a report.

Provision of information

Submitters must provide an email address and a copy of the email received when making a complaint. The email address will be used to acknowledge receipt of the complaint and to contact the complainant if further information is required about their complaint.

The ACMA requires specific information from a complainant in order to assess a complaint. This information is specified in the online submission form.

In the event a complainant does not provide sufficient information, the submission may be treated as a report.

It is not compulsory for header details to an email message that is the subject of complaint to be provided at the time of submission. However, the ACMA may request this information at a later date to assist in any investigation relating to the complaint. It is, however, compulsory for the content of the email message to be provided.

Anonymous complaints

Anonymous complaints are accepted. However, in order for the ACMA to resolve a complaint, you must provide consent to the ACMA disclosing your electronic address to the respondent, if the ACMA considers this appropriate. The ACMA may not be able to fully resolve an anonymous complaint.

Handling submissions

Each complaint, enquiry and report is given a unique identifying number. This number is advised to the submitter at the time of submission.

Staff will assess each complaint on a case-by-case basis. ACMA staff will determine if the message within the complaint has an Australian link and is therefore regulated by the Spam Act. Staff will also determine whether the complaint is more suitable for an alternate agency.

If a complainant has not brought their complaint to the attention of the message sender, the ACMA may, in the first instance, ask the complainant to contact the respondent directly to attempt to resolve the complaint. This may include using an unsubscribe facility.

The submission of the complaint form provides the ACMA with express consent to release the complainant’s electronic address to the message sender, should this be deemed necessary by the ACMA. Circumstances where disclosure of the complainant’s electronic address will be necessary include to request for the electronic address to be removed from the mailing list of a legitimate Australian or overseas business.

If the complainant does not wish to provide consent to release the electronic address, the spam can be reported to the ACMA using the report email address or Spam SMS.

The complainant will not necessarily be advised of the outcome of its communications with the message sender.

Instant messages

However, complaints submitted about instant messages will include the option to choose whether or not express consent to release the complainant’s electronic address is provided. If the complainant does not wish to provide consent to release the electronic address, the submission will be treated as a report. This exception is provided for instant messages because of the inability to report instant messages via the medium they are received, as well as the ACMA’s wish to provide the option to report spam anonymously.

Reports submitted using the report email address

The ACMA will acknowledge reports automatically.

In the acknowledgement, the ACMA will advise the submitter that the submission will be regarded as a report. The ACMA will not respond to any additional information provided in the report from the submitter unless it requires further information to assist it in its anti-spam activities. 

Reports of email spam are stored in the ACMA’s Spam Intelligence Database. In some instances, the ACMA may contact a submitter to request further information or a written statement.

Spam SMS—reporting spam by SMS

The ACMA’s 0429 999 888 telephone number (Spam SMS) is a reporting mechanism for SMS spam. Forwarding an SMS message will not stop the receipt of unwanted SMS messages and is not an unsubscribe mechanism. The submission of a Spam SMS report will incur the cost of sending a standard SMS, as per the submitter’s mobile telephone provider’s rates.

Spam SMS submissions are treated as reports unless accompanied by an online complaint form submission. Submitters will receive an SMS message acknowledging their submission.

All Spam SMS submissions will be given a unique identification number and this should be quoted in any follow-up complaint information or correspondence with the ACMA.

Registering for Spam SMS

Registering for Spam SMS will not stop the receipt of unwanted SMS messages.

The ACMA may request the registered submitter provides further information about the SMS message that has been submitted.

Complainants have the option to register their details for Spam SMS during the online submission process. Previous complainants (those who lodged complaints after 1 April 2010) are not automatically registered for Spam SMS.

Enquiries

The ACMA will action enquiries within six working days of receipt.

Information provided in response to enquiries is intended as a guide only and while every reasonable effort has been made to ensure the information is accurate, it should not be relied on as legal advice or regarded as a substitute for legal advice in individual cases.

It is at the ACMA’s discretion to determine whether to refer a submitter to a more appropriate agent. In the event an enquiry is referred, the submitter will be advised.

Telephone complaints and enquiries

The ACMA accepts telephone complaints, reports and enquiries.

The ACMA may request further information to be submitted electronically, including a copy of the electronic message.

Anonymous complaints may be made by telephone. 

Review of complaints

As per the ACMA’s Client Service Charter, if a complainant is not happy with the way that their complaint has been handled, the matter can be escalated by contacting the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

Investigations

If the ACMA is unable to resolve a complaint, it will consider whether it is appropriate to commence a formal investigation under the Telecommunications Act 1997 regarding the message sender’s compliance with the Spam Act 2003.

In most cases, the ACMA will inform both the complainant and the respondent where a formal investigation is commenced. Note: Under the Telecommunications Act 1997, the ACMA may not advise a respondent of an investigation.

The ACMA may request that a complainant make a formal written statement in relation to the complaint. In the written statement, the ACMA may ask the complainant to formally respond to assertions made by the respondent in relation to the complaint.

The ACMA will advise the complainant of the outcomes of the investigation as the ACMA’s internal policies allow.



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Background The ACMA is responsible for the enforcement of the Spam Act 2003 (the Spam Act) and accepts complaints, reports and enquiries about spam from the Australian public. This process is managed by the Anti-spam Team (AST). Complaints can be submitted to the ACMA by the completion of an online form, specifically tailored to whether […]

 

Cybersmart encourages Indigenous Australians to “Be Deadly Online”

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Today the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s Cybersmart program launched Australia’s first comprehensive package of cybersafety resources for Indigenous communities.

Tackling cyberbullying, sexting and digital footprint management, Be Deadly Online responds to Indigenous community leaders’ concerns about the impact of social media on family and community relationships and on young people themselves by offering positive, practical advice on playing smart online.

The program is made up of a series of short animations, posters and a behind-the scenes ‘making of’ video, all hosted on a specially-created portal within the Cybersmart website. It was created with major contributions from a number of Indigenous communities across Australia, including Yarrabah in Tropical North Queensland, regional Victoria and the Mid West Gasgoyne region in Western Australia.

‘Indigenous communities’ stories about how social media use has affected their lives—in positive and negative ways—are at the heart of Be Deadly Online,’ said Richard Bean ACMA Deputy Chairman and Cybersafety spokesman.

‘Online business is everyone’s business, so Be Deadly Online has been created so that anyone from a 12 year old, to a community leader, to police, educators and parents can use the resources in the way that suits them and their needs.’

The pilot program of Be Deadly Online has already been well-received, with positive initial results reinforcing Cybersmart’s evidence-based approach to cybersafety education.

Bernadine Yeatman, Head of Department for Yarrabah State School said, ‘You mob, if you want to be deadly, you’ve got to be Cybersmart online.

‘Cybersmart Champions remember that online business is everyone’s business. They remember that their digital footprint can either build up their community’s reputation or tear it down. Cybersmart Champions always respect themselves, others and their culture when online.’

‘This is about community taking control rather than us imposing a one-size-fits-all solution,’ Richard Bean said. ‘Be Deadly Online has been created by and for Indigenous communities across Australia and the ACMA is proud to be part of a positive way forward with cybersafety education.’

More information and access the Be Deadly Online resources are available here.

For more information or to arrange an interview please contact: Gretchen Martins, Senior Communications Advisor on (03) 9963 6801, 0404 836 636 or Gretchen.Martins@acma.gov.au; Emma Rossi, Media Manager, (02) 9334 7719,

0434 652 063 or media@acma.gov.au.

Media release 19/2014 – 4 April



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Today the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s Cybersmart program launched Australia’s first comprehensive package of cybersafety resources for Indigenous communities. Tackling cyberbullying, sexting and digital footprint management, Be Deadly Online responds to Indigenous community leaders’ concerns about the impact of social media on family and community relationships and on young people themselves by offering positive, […]

 

Okay I might try that. – spoof Phishing Scams

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Please send us any scam/phishing emails you have received by reporting them here

For access to our huge blacklist of domain names and to sign up to our live feed of ALL the scams we receive please take a look at our Honeytrap service

If you have received the email below, please remember that it is very common for these email scams to be redistributed at a later date with only slightly different content, such as a different subject or return address, or with the fake webpage(s) hosted on a different webserver.

We aim to report every variant of the scams we receive, so even if it appears that a scam you receive has already been reported, please submit it to us anyway.



Source link

 

Please send us any scam/phishing emails you have received by reporting them here For access to our huge blacklist of domain names and to sign up to our live feed of ALL the scams we receive please take a look at our Honeytrap service If you have received the email below, please remember that it […]

 

Mobile premium services | ACMA

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Mobile premium services provide information and entertainment services that are delivered to your mobile phone and cost more than standard SMS (text message) or MMS (multimedia message).

Premium services include:

  • mobile ringtones
  • mobile wallpaper
  • online games
  • chat services
  • SMS voting / competitions
  • horoscopes
  • age-restricted content
  • news, sports and weather updates
  • music and video clips.

When accessing these services you may need to download data from the internet. Your phone company may charge you a download fee on top of the premium service charge. Check the terms and conditions of your contract.

Accessing mobile premium services

There are a number of ways to access mobile premium services including:

  • SMS—responding to an advertisement by texting a keyword to a number starting with ‘191’, ‘193’ – ‘197’ or ‘199’
  • online—entering your mobile phone number on a website
  • IVR (interactive voice response)—you call an automated voice service on your mobile phone to request a mobile premium service.

A one-off or subscription service

Mobile premium services can be:

  • single purchase service—you only pay once
  • subscription service—you are charged on either a fee-per-time period basis or on a fee-per-message basis; for example, $10 per week or $5 per message pair with two messages per week. 

This must be clearly stated in any advertising, along with details of how often you will receive the content, its cost and how to stop the service.

  • Advertising for subscription or ongoing services must include the word ‘subscription’ or ‘subscribe’.
  • Subscription services will also send a text to your mobile phone after your initial request to confirm you want the service.
  • You can cancel your mobile premium service at any time by texting ‘STOP’ to the content supplier.

Receiving unrequested text messages or services

There are a few things you can do to stop receiving text messages and services:

  • Call the premium content supplier’s helpline about charges or to stop the service.
  • Text ‘STOP’ to the number included in the message or on your bill. You will receive a message from the content supplier confirming cancellation of the service.
  • Contact your mobile phone company and ask them to bar all calls or messages from premium SMS and MMS numbers.

Stop SMS text advertising (spam)

If you receive unwanted messages that advertise a business or service, or invite you to sign up to a subscription service, you could be getting ‘spammed’.

Spam is the common term for electronic ‘junk mail’—messages that you have not agreed to receive. The content of spam messages varies. Some messages promote products or services, while others attempt to trick users into providing bank account or credit card details. Many spam messages contain offensive or fraudulent material.

The Spam Act and Codes of Practice generally prohibit the sending of commercial electronic messages that you haven’t consented to receive.

If you think you have received spam on your mobile, keep the message and make a complaint to the ACMA.


Consent to receive a mobile premium service

It is important to know what you are agreeing to before you consent to purchase a mobile premium service on your mobile or a website. 

Content suppliers have to set out important terms and conditions of the mobile premium services they are selling in their advertisements. Make sure you read the terms and conditions before purchasing premium services. By agreeing to receive the service, you are agreeing to all the terms and conditions. When you agree to receive a mobile premium service, look for the means by which you can ‘opt out’ of receiving marketing messages in the future.

Confirmation messages

You will get a text message from the content supplier, asking you to confirm you want the service.

If you want the service, reply with the ‘keyword’ to confirm. If you do not want the service, ignore the message.

Mobile premium services costs

Costs for mobile premium services are calculated in many ways and may include:

  • a ‘sign-up’ cost
  • a set cost per message sent or received or message pair
  • a combination of cost per message and the amount of data downloaded; for example, a charge for the ringtone or game plus a download charge from your phone company.

Terms and conditions

The terms and conditions will tell you:

  • The cost of the servicehow much each SMS message you send or receive will cost you.
  • The frequency of the servicehow often you will receive SMS messages or downloads.
  • How to cancel the service—you can SMS ‘STOP’ to the service provider sending you the services.
  • Who you can contact for any problems or questionsa helpline number is included in messages from the service provider.
  • What happens to your personal information—check the service provider’s privacy policy.

How long will it take to cancel the service?

It can take up to one business day for your request to be processed. Once you have sent a ‘STOP’ text message:

  • you will not be charged for any more services from that number
  • you should receive confirmation your service has been cancelled.

Confirmation messages

A confirmation message contains information about the service including:

  • the service name
  • the cost of any charges on sign up and any ongoing charges for the service
  • a helpline number
  • the number to send a text with ‘STOP’ to cancel the service.

It is a good idea to keep this message in case you need help later.

Mobile premium services rules

Mobile premium services which use numbers with the prefixes 191, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197 and 199 are subject to the following code:

The code was developed by Communications Alliance Ltd and registered by the ACMA.

Blocking mobile premium services

You can contact your phone company to request premium SMS and MMS barring.

Barring will ensure you do not receive further premium SMS and MMS services and you will not incur any new charges from premium SMS and MMS services.

To just stop a particular service you are receiving:

  • reply ‘STOP’ to messages from each service you don’t want.

If you continue to receive marketing messages for services you haven’t requested, even if they are free, they may be spam.

Report spam to the ACMA:

Helpline number

Unresolved problems

If an issue about your premium service remains unresolved, you can lodge a complaint with the following appropriate agencies: 

 



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Mobile premium services provide information and entertainment services that are delivered to your mobile phone and cost more than standard SMS (text message) or MMS (multimedia message). Premium services include: mobile ringtones mobile wallpaper online games chat services SMS voting / competitions horoscopes age-restricted content news, sports and […]

 

ACMA Hotline steps up fight against child exploitation material

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New data released today shows images of an estimated 36,000 abused children were reported to law enforcement and international authorities by the Australian Communications and Media Authority in 2013.

The images were uncovered as part of 3,258 investigations conducted by the ACMA Hotline into child sexual abuse material in 2013—a 154 per cent increase on the previous year.

The data provides a rare insight into the nature and scope of the problem of online child sexual abuse material. The vast majority of victims were girls (92 per cent). The most common age category was pre-pubescent (83 per cent), while eight per cent of the images involved infants.

‘Every single image taken down helps to make the online environment safer and prevents the re-victimisation of the children who have suffered abuse,’ said ACMA Deputy Chairman and Cybersafety spokesman, Richard Bean. ‘Every image is essentially a crime scene.’

More than half of the material investigated was hosted in the United States of America, while the remainder was hosted in a wide variety of other countries, highlighting the global nature of the problem.

‘The ACMA works closely with Australian law enforcement agencies and the International community of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE). Together we pursue take-down and law enforcement notification of child sexual abuse material wherever it is hosted or produced,’ Richard Bean said.

In 2013, the ACMA made over 3,000 reports through INHOPE, with content typically being removed in three days or fewer. You can make a difference. If you encounter child exploitation material online take immediate action by making a report to acma.gov.au/hotline 

If you have information about a crime, report it to Crime Stoppers online or call 1800 333 000.

Reports to the Hotline and Crime Stoppers can be made anonymously.

NOTE: If you believe that a child or any other person is in IMMEDIATE danger, please contact the police on 000 (triple zero).

For more information or to arrange an interview, please contact: Emma Rossi, Media Manager, (02) 9334 7719 and 0434 652 063 or media@acma.gov.au.

Media release 20/2014 – 7 April



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New data released today shows images of an estimated 36,000 abused children were reported to law enforcement and international authorities by the Australian Communications and Media Authority in 2013. The images were uncovered as part of 3,258 investigations conducted by the ACMA Hotline into child sexual abuse material in 2013—a 154 per cent increase on the […]

 

Chase Bank Online Access Limitation! – Chase Phishing Scams

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Please send us any scam/phishing emails you have received by reporting them here

For access to our huge blacklist of domain names and to sign up to our live feed of ALL the scams we receive please take a look at our Honeytrap service

If you have received the email below, please remember that it is very common for these email scams to be redistributed at a later date with only slightly different content, such as a different subject or return address, or with the fake webpage(s) hosted on a different webserver.

We aim to report every variant of the scams we receive, so even if it appears that a scam you receive has already been reported, please submit it to us anyway.



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Please send us any scam/phishing emails you have received by reporting them here For access to our huge blacklist of domain names and to sign up to our live feed of ALL the scams we receive please take a look at our Honeytrap service If you have received the email below, please remember that it […]

 

Spam statistics: November 2012 | ACMA

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To give stakeholders and other citizens better insights into our investigations work, we present this statistical breakdown of the Spam Act compliance and investigations work we have recently done and are currently doing. Where compliance activities or investigations are ongoing, or have not been published, the ACMA is generally unable to give detail of the entities and issues involved for individual matters or otherwise make comment.

Spam Act: reports and complaints received per month as at 30 November 2012
Spam stats - Nov 2012

* Reports provide a mechanism for consumers to inform or forward Spam to the ACMA without lodging a formal complaint.

Spam Act: reports and complaints received by service type in November 2012
Spam stats Svce types - Nov 2012

Spam Act: informal warning letters sent per month as at 30 November 2012
Spam stats Informal warning - Nov 2012

* Informal warning letter represent an informal approach to compliance issues.

Spam Act: current investigations as at 30 November 2012
Spam stats Current investigations - Nov 2012

Spam Act: investigations finalised per month as at 30 November 2012
Spam stats Finalised investigations - Nov 2012



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To give stakeholders and other citizens better insights into our investigations work, we present this statistical breakdown of the Spam Act compliance and investigations work we have recently done and are currently doing. Where compliance activities or investigations are ongoing, or have not been published, the ACMA is generally unable to give detail of the […]

 

Consumer alert: Scammers posing as Aussie brands

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Scam alert: Do not give out personal information to the scammers posing as Qantas and Virgin Australia.



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Scam alert: Do not give out personal information to the scammers posing as Qantas and Virgin Australia. Source link  

 

Your account will be limited. – PayPal Phishing Scams

0 Scam Alerts No Comments


Please send us any scam/phishing emails you have received by reporting them here

For access to our huge blacklist of domain names and to sign up to our live feed of ALL the scams we receive please take a look at our Honeytrap service

If you have received the email below, please remember that it is very common for these email scams to be redistributed at a later date with only slightly different content, such as a different subject or return address, or with the fake webpage(s) hosted on a different webserver.

We aim to report every variant of the scams we receive, so even if it appears that a scam you receive has already been reported, please submit it to us anyway.



Source link

 

Please send us any scam/phishing emails you have received by reporting them here For access to our huge blacklist of domain names and to sign up to our live feed of ALL the scams we receive please take a look at our Honeytrap service If you have received the email below, please remember that it […]